British Airways joins Brighton Pride parade

British Airways is Flying Proud at Brighton & Hove Pride today
British Airways is Flying Proud at Brighton & Hove Pride today

British Airways is Flying Proud at Brighton & Hove Pride today, where the airline is sponsoring the Pride parade and festival in support of the LGBT+ community, with employees from across the airline joining in the celebrations.

More than 300,000 people poured out into the city’s streets to participate in and watch the all-singing, all-dancing carnival of colour, as The Pride Community Parade made its way from the seafront to Preston Park where the spectacle continues this afternoon.

For the latest updates on Brighton Pride, see our live blog here: https://www.brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/news/brighton-pride-2018-live-blog-1-8589641

Spectators couldn’t miss the distinct British Airways float carrying colleagues and drag queens, which was adorned with silhouettes of landmark cities the airline flies to and a turquoise colour scheme, representing magic and art to fit within the Colour Your World festival theme.

Angela Williams, British Airways’ People Director, said: “British Airways has a long and proud history of supporting the LGBT+ community and we are a proud supporter of Brighton & Hove Pride. Over 100 colleagues from our LGBT+ network Flying Proud will be taking part in the events of the weekend and flying the flag for modern Britain.

"As a global airline, with a diverse base of customers and colleagues, diversity and inclusion is key to delivering a better service for our customers, and to enable an open and welcoming culture for all our colleagues.”

Flying Proud is British Airways’ network for LGBT+ colleagues, with over 500 members across BA covering all parts of the airline and global operation. The mission is to create an environment where everyone can truly be themselves whatever their gender identity or sexual orientation.

The British Airways' group's appearance at the Pride festival came as protesters took to the streets in London to challenge the airline's role in deporting people identified by the Home Office.