Brighton primary school protest council plans to reduce classroom sizes

The group was protesting against a 50 per cent reduction in their reception classroom sizes, proposed by the Brighton and Hove City Council.

Thursday, 25th November 2021, 11:15 am
Updated Thursday, 25th November 2021, 3:06 pm

Pupils, parents and teachers of Carden Primary School joined together to protest proposed council cuts to classroom sizes.

The group was protesting against a 50 per cent reduction in their reception classroom sizes, proposed by the Brighton and Hove City Council.

The march took place on Wednesday, November 24 at 3.15pm to march from the school on County Oak Avenue to Carden Park.

The council said the plans were an option for addressing the problems in future years caused by the national falling birth rate.

Abby Kinslow, a parent at the school, said: “Carden is a school that currently has a well-managed budget, but halving the intake would certainly cause financial struggle.

“All of our next nearest schools are full or also reducing, but the number of young families in the area is rising as people move out of town. If this goes through, the council are going to be creating a deficit of spaces in our area and leaving a surplus in others."

The group was protesting against a 50 per cent reduction in their reception classroom sizes, proposed by the Brighton and Hove City Council.

The protesters plan to raise awareness of the proposed dramatic reduction in places and stop the decision being made, allowing Carden to continue admitting up to 60 children in each school year.

Brighton and Hove City Council is consulting the public about proposals to reduce school admission numbers at seven primary schools from September 2023.

The proposals include a move to limit Carden Primary to one form of entry – or 30 children joining reception – each year in response to falling school rolls across the area.

Councillor Sarah Nield said: “This consultation is a chance for governors, headteachers, families and residents to give their views on our proposals.

“The proposals for the seven schools are in no way a reflection of the quality of education that they provide pupils. Locally and nationally we are facing a very serious problem with falling numbers of children set to start school in the next few years.”

A decision is due to be taken at a meeting of the Councils’ Children, Young People and Skills Committee on January 10.

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