Here are 10 of the strangest UK parking laws to be aware of to ensure you avoid being fined by authorities

10 of the strangest UK parking laws

Parking your car may sound like a simple task, but there are some lesser known laws that apply in the UK that could see drivers caught out and landed with a hefty fine.

Researchers from LeaseVan.co.uk have revealed some of the most obscure rules that drivers could fall foul of when parking on a public road. Here are 10 of the strangest UK parking laws to be aware of to ensure you avoid being fined by authorities.

Using wheelie bins, cones or other objects to reserve a parking space near your house or work space could result in a fine, as it may be regarded as causing a dangerous obstruction on the road.

1. Don't save a space

Using wheelie bins, cones or other objects to reserve a parking space near your house or work space could result in a fine, as it may be regarded as causing a dangerous obstruction on the road.
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Vehicles parking on a road where the speed limit is more than 30mph, facing away from the traffic or outside of a designated parking area should technically have their side lights on overnight to help prevent collisions.

2. Leave the lights on

Vehicles parking on a road where the speed limit is more than 30mph, facing away from the traffic or outside of a designated parking area should technically have their side lights on overnight to help prevent collisions.
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Drivers and passengers need to check all of their mirrors before exiting a parked vehicle as it is always the responsibility of occupants to ensure opening doors will not impede passing pedestrians, cyclists or other vehicles.

3. Check all mirrors

Drivers and passengers need to check all of their mirrors before exiting a parked vehicle as it is always the responsibility of occupants to ensure opening doors will not impede passing pedestrians, cyclists or other vehicles.
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Parking on the pavement has been outlawed by default in London since the 1970s, unless permission is otherwise granted. For the rest of the UK, the practice isn't allowed where it might cause an obstruction.

4. Avoid the pavement

Parking on the pavement has been outlawed by default in London since the 1970s, unless permission is otherwise granted. For the rest of the UK, the practice isn't allowed where it might cause an obstruction.
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